About Us

Larry Gagosian opened his first gallery in Los Angeles in 1980, specialising in modern and contemporary art. Five years later, he expanded his activities to New York, inaugurating his first Chelsea gallery with an exhibition of works from the Pop art collection of Emily and Burton Tremaine. From 1989 to 1996 he owned a gallery at 65 Thompson Street in SoHo with the renowned dealer Leo Castelli, where they showed Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, and other preeminent artists of the postwar generation.

In forty years Gagosian has evolved into a global network with eighteen exhibition spaces in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, London, Paris, Geneva, Basel, Rome, Athens, and Hong Kong, designed by world-renowned architects including Caruso St John, Richard Gluckman, Richard Meier, Jean Nouvel, Selldorf Architects, and wHY Architecture.

Gagosian’s vibrant contemporary program features the work of leading international artists including Georg Baselitz, Ellen Gallagher, Andreas Gursky, Anselm Kiefer, Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Taryn Simon, Rachel Whiteread, and many others. Additionally, unparalleled historical exhibitions are prepared and presented on the work of legendary artists such as Francis Bacon, Alexander Calder, Willem de Kooning, Lucio Fontana, Helen Frankenthaler, Alberto Giacometti, Roy Lichtenstein, Piero Manzoni, Claude Monet, Henry Moore, Jackson Pollock, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, and others. A series of groundbreaking Picasso surveys curated by John Richardson has been attended by hundreds of thousands of visitors in New York and London.

Current Exhibition

There’s always sound that enters when I’m thinking about a painting. To me they have sound.

—Mary Weatherford

Gagosian is pleased to present Train Yards, an exhibition of paintings by Mary Weatherford. This is her first solo exhibition with the gallery in London.

Weatherford roots abstract painting in subjective experience, evoking urban and rural environments while experimenting with internal painterly dynamics around light, colour, and gesture, as well as the relationship between a painted surface and various three-dimensional addenda. Preparing each canvas with a mixture of gesso and marble dust, she conjures a wide range of chromatic and textural effects. In her best-known works, sponged grounds of vinyl-based emulsion on heavy linen panels are surmounted by one or more carefully shaped and placed neon-filled glass tubes.

Weatherford began using neon in 2012, inspired by the illuminated signs that lined the streets of Bakersfield, California, where she was then working as a visiting artist and educator. Casting an intense industrial light onto the modulated fields of colour beneath them, the tubes (which sometimes extend beyond the edges of the painting) read as hand-drawn lines, their trailing power cords adding a further graphic and dimensional aspect.

Train Yards, installation view, 2020, © Mary Weatherford, Photo: Lucy Dawkins, Courtesy Gagosian.

Train Yards, installation view, 2020, © Mary Weatherford, Photo: Lucy Dawkins, Courtesy Gagosian.

Orion's Belt, 2016, Flashe and neon on linen, © Mary Weatherford, Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio, Courtesy Gagosian.

Train Yards, installation view, 2020, © Mary Weatherford, Photo: Lucy Dawkins, Courtesy Gagosian.

No. 4000, 2017–18, Flashe and neon on linen, © Mary Weatherford, Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio, Courtesy Gagosian.